The Truth is Out There!

— And it's out at the Drug Enforcement Agency website and museum, in Crystal City, just down the road!

Did you know that the drug trade has a “symbiotic” relationship with terrorism? Well, you will when you see the shocking exhibit Target America: Traffickers, Terrorists, and You. You can see the work of drug traffickers right before your eyes in this display of the ruins of the World Trade Center:

On the testimonial page, Kate and Alex from Greenwich, Connecticut share their feelings: “We liked the remains of the Pentagon and the World Trade Center. It was moving to see the remains up close.” We like the remains too, Kate and Alex! They show us that murder, suicide, and choking on one's own vomit are only a few of the more pleasant ways that drugs kill.

Or stop by Illegal Drugs: A Modern History where you will learn about the role of the shifty Chinese in “America's First Drug Epidemic: 1850-1914,” and that

By the 1960s, the great majority of Americans had forgotten the lessons of the first drug epidemic. Moreover, the new Bohemians, Beat literary types, were sending a very different and powerful cultural message: drugs and altered states were part of being hip, social rebels. By encouraging a whole generation to see drug use as “normal,” these cultural icons consigned millions to re-learn the painful consequences of rampant drug use–even as the drug menu was expanding to include amphetamines and psychedelics. When many of the 76 million baby boomers embraced not just drugs, but also dealing and trafficking, the drug culture exploded.

The U.S. Government responded with new laws and new anti-drug units, culminating in the creation of the Drug Enforcement Administration in 1973.

And thank God for the DEA! Not only are they whipping that drug problem, and shutting down those damn terrorists, but they also provide us with sound information about the dangers of drugs on a daily basis, and create wonderful educational opportunities, like the DEA Museum and Visitors Center, where visitors to the nations capital are encouraged to contribute their own thoughts.

Madeleine Patton, of Houston, Texas says, “I think that the main problem with drugs is that people don't understand that the law is here to protect you. People are so dead set on breaking the rules that they don't care wether or not it is a good law.”

They sure don't care, Madeleine. But then people are silly.

Matt McDonald, also of Houston, sure got the message. (And he really means it: all caps!): “NICE JOB ON THE MUESEUM. IT REALLY HITS PEOPLE WHERE IT'S SUPPOSED TO. I DON'T THINK WE SHOULD HAVE PEOPLE LIKE RAP STARS, ACTORS AND MANY OTHERS SHOWING-OFF BECAUSE THEY DO DRUGS. I MEAN, WHOEVER DECIDED DRUGS WHERE [SIC!]”COOL”?

Clearly no one should show off, Matt. Showing off makes the less fortunate feel bad. When rap stars and actors show off, all we can do is shake our heads, and puzzle over the fact that they have had successful careers as rap stars and actors despite the devastating effects of drugs on their lives. Of course, no one person decided drugs were cool, Matt. The coolness of drugs is a social construct, built out of many, many individual judgments. So until more good people start thinking like you, Matt, drugs unfortunately will still be cool, and you still won't. But keep up the good fight!

I, for one, plan on going the DEA Museum and Visitors Center. You should go, too, to see how wisely your tax money has been invested in ensuring that Americans of all ages have access to the truth about drugs in our history and in our lives today.

[UPDATE: It has come to my attention that certain young people would revel in the irony of attending the museum's while “high” on marijuana (aka, “grass”, “weed”, “reefer”, “Mary Jane,” “chronic,” etc). Besides constituting a dishonor to the brave men and women who risk their lives policing our air and waterways to prevent the infiltration of our borders by money-grubbing Mexicans, Colombians, and Moslem terrorists seeking to poison the youth of America, the effects of “weed” will leave you permanently addled, unable to hold a decent job, dependent on the charity of hopefully loving friends and family, and unfit for higher political office. Now, if you would like to go to the museum with me, I'll be happy to show how we can have a great time without chemical “enhancement,” and maybe afterwards we can have a few drinks or six! So drop a line! We'll write the greatest testimonials!]

  • mk

    Hahaha, well played.

    If Robin Hanson wasn’t a blogger he would say “Blogging isn’t about ideas.” But I don’t know what he’d say now.

  • “Blogging isn’t about… Readers”

  • C

    Try these:

    Blogging isn’t about conversation.
    Blogging isn’t about engagement.
    Blogging isn’t about sharing.

  • Blogging isn’t about positive declarative statements, which are more difficult to refute than negative declarative statements.

  • I meant easier to refute, more difficult to defend

  • Blogging is new enough that we don’t have as clear standard stories about what it is for. But “Blogging isn’t about conversation” is pretty good.

  • L

    School is about learning for some people.
    Charity is about helping for some people.
    Etc.

    Not everyone is full of shit.

  • Chuk

    Blogging isn’t about amateurism.

    Blogging isn’t about punditry.

    Blogging isn’t about memoir.

    Blogging isn’t about “dilettante swarms”/open source.

    Blogging isn’t about leveling social hierarchies.

    BTW, I’d like to nominate this as the greatest snowclone of all time. Glen Whitman’s position as a World-Historical figure is secure!